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Monday, September 7, 2009

The History Of The Clarinet And The Chalumeaut

The history of the clarinet is an interesting story of ingenuity and excitement. For years people were trying to come up with a new sound, a sound that was full of soul with a little bit of raspy heat. And the history of the clarinet begins with the chalumeau. This was the very first reed instrument. It was designed in the 1600's and while it was popular it was not a very versatile instrument, it has only 1.5 octaves to it. Even though, it still was the beginning of the history of the clarinet. And the history of the clarinet is an important history, one that led to many other magnificent instruments being created.

What makes the clarinet different from its predecessor according to history of the clarinet is the speaker key. This is what gave the clarinet much more range that what came before. It was Johann Christoph Denner and his son that came up with this great find. And because of this invention according to history of the clarinet it is this man who is responsible for inventing the clarinet. And the history of the clarinet is never wrong or off in any way, at least not any history that is written by me.

If you listen to the history of the clarinet you will learn that the clarinet has a cylindrical bore and while it may not look like this is the case it really is. It is only the bottom part of the clarinet, the bell, that has a flare to it. The unique sound of the clarinet is all due to the bore and it has its own place in the history of the clarinet. It is what makes the clarinet what it really is, a marvelous sounding machine that can bring out the passion in anyone who hears it.

According to the history of the clarinet the holes for the fingers were not always the way they appear on it today. In fact the modern look and feel of the clarinet holes were not adapted until the mid 1800s. So you can thank this period in the history of the clarinet for the way that the clarinet is played. It is wonderful and perfect just the way it is but this was not always the case in the history of the clarinet.

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